MAMMOTH IVORY BEAR PIN/PENDANT by ZEALANDIA DESIGNS

This adorable bear is carved from mammoth ivory. Created by Zealandia Designs, he hangs from a silver bar which is engraved with a formline bear design. Turn him over and you will see loops for a chain so he can become a pendant, and a pin-back, if you prefer to wear him as a pin.DSCF2096[1] He measures 1 1/2 inches high and 3/4 inches at his widest point. The silver bar is 1 1/4 inches long. He sells for $396.00, with first-class insured shipping included.
You may order this bear directly from me by going to my “about me” page and either emailing or calling. Please do not enter your payment information in an email. Leave me a phone number and I can call to collect your payment information.

Bizarre Alaskan Story II: New Twist to Bear-Baiting?

According to the Huffington Post, last year a man in a realistic-looking bear costume, complete with head, ran through the area close to a weir on the Chilkoot River near Haines.  A crowd had gathered near the weir to watch a sow and two cubs who were feeding there.  They were startled when the man, dressed as a bear, began to jump up and down and then got within 5 to 10 feet of the cubs.  An Alaska Fish & Game technician moved the sow away for the man’s safety, and then tried to talk to the man, who refused to identify himself.  The man then drove off, never removing his costume.  The article said troopers were investigating and the man could face wildlife harassment charges.

Why was he bothering the bears in the first place?  No one knows.  Perhaps he felt they were getting more than their share of salmon.

PART I: OVERRUN WITH DANDELIONS? MAKE WINE!

Spring comes to Gustavus when the dull colors of winter give way to the greens of the forest under-story and grassy lawns.  Then, we know the season has arrived for sure when the first dandelions appear.  Their bright-yellow flowers, like little suns reflecting back from the ground, lift our hearts and bring smiles to our faces.

As spring continues, the dandelions become more and more prolific, until they seem to be trying to take over the world.  Never fear — I have a solution here for you.  When you get tired of looking at that field of yellow, you can make a very fine wine from the blossoms.  You’ll need 15 quarts of them for your first batch, so start picking!

Soon after you start your wine the remaining Continue reading

PART II: HOW TO EAT A DANDELION

The dandelion (Taraxicum genus) is a perennial, and a member of the very large composite
family.  “Dandelion” comes from the French name, “dent de lion” (tooth of the lion.)

Roots, crowns (parts between roots and ground surface), and tops, from young leaves to flower buds and full blooms, can be eaten.  They are an excellent source of vitamins B, C, and A.  The plant is especially high in calcium, and also contains potassium, phosphorous and sodium. Here is a summary of ways dandelions can be eaten:

Roots:  Scrape, slice, and boil roots in salted water until tender, then eat as a vegetable.  Being part of the chicory family, the roots may also be dried in the oven, ground, and used as a coffee substitute.  I would recommend Continue reading

A SELECTION OF WEIRD ALASKAN LAWS

  1.  It is illegal to push a live moose out of a moving airplane.  I’d like to know what the moose was doing there in the first place.
  2. You are breaking a law if you tie your pet dog to the roof of your car.
  3. You cannot live in your trailer as it is being hauled across the city.
  4. You can’t slip an alcoholic beverage to the moose in your yard.  Apparently, he does not handle his liquor well.
  5. Though it is legal to shoot a bear with a gun (in season and with the proper permit, of course!) waking a sleeping bear to shoot a photograph is prohibited.
  6. Owners of flamingos are not permitted to take the bird into the barber shop.  If the bird really wants a haircut and shave, you will have to fulfill its wishes yourself. 

FINE RUSSIAN CRAFTS: HAND-MADE, HAND-PAINTED MATRYOSHKA DOLLS

Your Russian vocabulary word for the day is “matryoshka.”  The word means “little matron” and is the diminuative form of the Russian woman’s name, Matriona.  For our purposes, the name can be translated as “Russian nesting doll.” These dolls, turned on a lathe, were made in diminishing sizes, cut in half, and placed inside each other, smallest to largest.  The smallest doll was turned from a single piece of wood.

The first “matryoshka” set was made in 1890.  Traditionally, the outer doll was a woman and the figures inside could be either gender.  The innermost doll was typically the baby of the family.  Over the years, many themes have 2 doll sets1been used.  Recently the dolls even included replicas of Russian leaders.  Some other themes include floral designs, holidays, religious figures, politicians, movie stars, athletes, musicians, animals. and peasant families. For a time I had Eskimo family nesting dolls in my shop.

Many of these dolls are quite beautiful, displaying elaborate design or Continue reading

BIZARRE ALASKAN STORIES

Alaska is a land of magic and mystery. It is very true that “strange things are done ‘neath the midnight sun.” This column will be an ongoing collection of stories from the Alaskan mystique, designed to amuse and amaze you. Visit it each week for a new installment.

WOMAN PUNCHES BEAR TO SAVE DOG:  In Juneau, not far from my home in Gustavus, black bears sometimes roam the streets.  A Continue reading